Democracy in America

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It is difficult to say for what reason the Americans can trade at a lower rate than other nations; and one is at first led to attribute this circumstance to the physical or natural advantages which a
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I am well aware of the difficulties which attend this part of my subject, but although every expression which I am about to make use of may clash, upon some one point, with the feelings of the differ
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Chapter Summary North America divided into two vast regions, one inclining towards the Pole, the other towards the Equator—Valley of the Mississippi—Traces of the Revolutions of the Globe—Shore of th
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Procedure Of The Federal Courts Natural weakness of the judiciary power in confederations—Legislators ought to strive as much as possible to bring private individuals, and not States, before the Fede
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Advantages Of The Federal System In General, And Its Special Utility In America.
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Chapter Summary Utility of knowing the origin of nations in order to understand their social condition and their laws—America the only country in which the starting-point of a great people has been c
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Necessity Of Examining The Condition Of The States Before That Of The Union At Large.
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The English Government was not dissatisfied with an emigration which removed the elements of fresh discord and of further revolutions.
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Chapter Summary Natural strength of the majority in democracies—Most of the American Constitutions have increased this strength by artificial means—How this has been done—Pledged delegates—Moral powe
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What, then, is the uniform plan on which the government is conducted, and how is the compliance of the counties and their magistrates or the townships and their officers enforced?
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This cause of inferiority results from the nature of things, but it is not the only one; the second in importance is as follows: Sovereignty may be defined to be the right of making laws: in France,
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I have hitherto considered each State as a separate whole, and I have explained the different springs which the people sets in motion, and the different means of action which it employs.
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Legislative Power Of The State Division of the Legislative Body into two Houses—Senate—House of Representatives—Different functions of these two Bodies.
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I have hitherto examined the institutions of the United States; I have passed their legislation in review, and I have depicted the present characteristics of political society in that country.
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Re-election Of The President When the head of the executive power is re-eligible, it is the State which is the source of intrigue and corruption—The desire of being re-elected the chief aim of a Pres
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